Boxer’s fracture

A “Boxer’s fracture” is the second and/or third metacarpal transverse neck fracture that is more likely to occur from a straight punch.
The “Boxer’s” designation is suggestive of the generally well tolerated way of striking a hard object with the closed fist, with the second and third metacarpal bones absorbing most of the force.

A “Bar Room fracture” is a transverse fracture of the fourth and/or fifth metacarpal neck.
The “Bar Room” designation is suggestive of an inexperienced and/or intoxicated fighter that throws a “round house” type punch, with the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones absorbing most of the force.
This is generally accepted to be an unfavorable way of landing a punch.

Most recently the terms “Boxer’s” and “Bar Room” are used interchangeably to refer the second and third, and the fourth and fifth metacarpal fractures.


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