Esophagus Benign Tumors

1.Esophagus / Conventional Radiography / Papilloma. The lesion appears as a sessile, slightly lobulated polyp in the midesophagus
Papilloma.The lesion appears as a sessile, slightly lobulated polyp (arrows) in the midesophagus. An early esophageal carcinoma could produce similar findings.

2.Esophagus / Conventional Radiography / Barium study shows smooth, tapered narrowing of the distal esophagus, resembling achalasia. However, the narrowed segment is longer than that typically seen in achalasia. Also, the thickened muscle is seen bulging into the gastric fundus as a soft tissue mass (white arrow).
Esophageal leiomyomatosis.Barium study shows smooth, tapered narrowing of the distal esophagus (black arrows), resembling achalasia. However, the narrowed segment is longer than that typically seen in achalasia. Also, the thickened muscle is seen bulging into the gastric fundus as a soft tissue mass (white arrow). (From Levine MS, Buck JL, Pantongrag-Brown L, et al: Esophageal leiomyomatosis. Radiology 199:533-536, 1996.)

3.Esophagus / Conventional Radiography / Esophageal lipoma. This patient has a discrete submucosal mass that is indistinguishable from other, more common intramural tumors.
Esophageal lipoma.This patient has a discrete submucosal mass (arrows) that is indistinguishable from other, more common intramural tumors. (From Levine MS: Radiology of the Esophagus. Philadelphia, WB Saunders, 1989.)

4.Esophagus / Conventional Radiography / Adenomatous polyp in Barrett’s esophagus. The polyp originates at the gastroesophageal junction and extends into the distal esophagus above a hiatal hernia. Although this lesion could be mistaken for an inflammatory esophagogastric polyp, it is larger and more lobulated than most inflammatory polyps. The resected specimen contained a solitary focus of adenocarcinoma
Adenomatous polyp in Barrett’s esophagus.The polyp (arrows) originates at the gastroesophageal junction and extends into the distal esophagus above a hiatal hernia. Although this lesion could be mistaken for an inflammatory esophagogastric polyp, it is larger and more lobulated than most inflammatory polyps. The resected specimen contained a solitary focus of adenocarcinoma. (From Levine MS, Caroline D, Thompson JJ, et al: Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus: relationship to Barrett mucosa. Radiology 150:305-309, 1984.)

5.Esophagus / Conventional Radiography / Granular cell tumor.A smooth submucosal mass is seen in the midesophagus
Granular cell tumor.A smooth submucosal mass (arrow) is seen in the midesophagus. This lesion cannot be differentiated from other, more common submucosal lesions in the esophagus, such as leiomyomas. (From Levine MS: Radiology of the Esophagus. Philadelphia, WB Saunders, 1989.)

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