Lymphoid Interstitial Pneumonia

Lymphoid Interstitial Pneumonia ( Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonitis or LIP) is lymphocytic infiltration of the alveolar interstitium and air spaces. Number of View: 1036
Continue reading…

 

Azygos pseudo lobe

Azygos pseudo lobe is not a true lobe, does not have separate broncus or vasculature, due to invagination of azygos vein, no clinical significance. Number of View: 3083
Continue reading…

 

Tree in bud sign

In radiology, the tree-in-bud sign is a finding on a CT scan that indicates some degree of airway obstruction. The tree-in-bud sign indicates the presence of an infection that has spread endobronchially, and is classically associated with tuberculosis and bronchopneumonia. Number of View: 2704
Continue reading…

 

Aberrant subclavian artery

Aberrant subclavian artery, or aberrant subclavian artery syndrome refers to a rare anatomical variant of the origin of the right or left subclavian artery. This abnormality is the most common congenital vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The aberrant artery usually arises just distal to the left subclavian artery and crosses in the posterior part […]
Continue reading…

 

Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis (from sarc meaning flesh, -oid, like, and -osis, diseased or abnormal condition), also called sarcoid, Besnier-Boeck disease or Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease, is a disease in which abnormal collections of chronic inflammatory cells (granulomas) form as nodules in multiple organs. Number of View: 4221
Continue reading…

 

Pericardial effusion

Pericardial effusion (“fluid around the heart”) is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pericardial cavity. Because of the limited amount of space in the pericardial cavity, fluid accumulation will lead to an increased intrapericardial pressure and this can negatively affect heart function. When there is a pericardial effusion with enough pressure to adversely affect […]
Continue reading…

 

Pectus excavatum

Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior wall of the chest, in which several ribs and the sternum grow abnormally. This produces a caved-in or sunken appearance of the chest. It can either be present at birth or not develop until puberty. Number of View: 4829
Continue reading…

 

Pancoast tumor

A Pancoast tumor, also called a pulmonary sulcus tumor or superior sulcus tumor, is a tumor of the pulmonary apex. It is a type of lung cancer defined primarily by its location situated at the top end of either the right or left lung. It typically spreads to nearby tissues such as the ribs and […]
Continue reading…

 

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma, more precisely malignant mesothelioma, is a rare form of cancer that develops from the protective lining that covers many of the body’s internal organs, the mesothelium. It is usually caused by exposure to asbestos. Its most common site is the pleura (outer lining of the lungs and internal chest wall), but it may also […]
Continue reading…

 

Pulmonary embolism (PE)

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blockage of the main artery of the lung or one of its branches by a substance that has travelled from elsewhere in the body through the bloodstream (embolism). Usually this is due to embolism of a thrombus (blood clot) from the deep veins in the legs, a process termed venous […]
Continue reading…